American girl lanie meets kanani chock

american girl lanie meets kanani chock

The youngster was among about a dozen area girls who attended the book signing and storytelling session held at Jayhawk Ink inside the Kansas Union. Kurtz penned the book about American Girl’s “Girl of the Year 2010,” Lanie, and she was sharing her experiences writing the book with the some of American Girl’s biggest fans.

Sandres also brought along her favorite American Girl doll to Saturday’s event, and the two girls talked about what they like most about American Girl.

“The stories,” Chloe said, adding that she saw some remarkable similarities between herself and Lanie. Both are in fourth grade, both have science class and both like nature.

“They can relate to them,” said Sandres’ mom, Kim, of why the girls are so drawn by the phenomenon. Though the dolls are expensive — about $100 — Kim encourages the activity and has seen some positive effects from the American Girl experience.

For instance, Sandres has been talking about starting a book club in Lawrence, where she and other American Girl fans can discuss the books written about each doll.

American Girl is an American line of 18-inch (46 cm) dolls released in 1986 by Pleasant Company. The dolls portray eight- to eleven-year-old girls of a variety of ethnicities. They are sold with accompanying books told from the viewpoint of the girls. Originally the stories focused on various periods of American history, but were expanded in 1995 to include contemporary characters and stories, the latest addition being WellieWishers, a line of 14.5-inch (37 cm) dolls aimed for younger children.

The BeForever characters (originally known as "The American Girls Collection" or, colloquially, "Historical Characters") were initially the main focus of Pleasant Company. This product line aims to teach aspects of American history through a six book series from the perspective of a nine-year-old girl living in that time period. Although the books are written for the eight-to-thirteen-year-old target market, they endeavor to cover topics such as child labor , child abuse , poverty , racism , slavery , alcoholism , animal abuse , and war in manners appropriate for the understanding and sensibilities of the company's target market. [1]

The first dolls in the American Girl/Historical line (Samantha, Kirsten and Molly) shared the same face mold but had different hair and eye colors. The first dolls were created with white muslin bodies, but these cloth bodies were changed in 1991 from a white muslin to a matching flesh tone. This accommodated the low necklines of Late Colonial/Revolutionary period gowns produced for the Felicity Merriman character (also introduced in 1991). Additional face molds were later developed for other dolls, and the line to date includes ten characters covering the period 1764 to 1974.

The "Best Friends" line was introduced in 2004; supplemental characters from the core book series were created in doll form and marketed as "best friends" for some of the Historical Characters. These Best Friend dolls share the collections of the main characters, but each has her own book, and additional products were marketed under their names. [2] However, in May 2014, American Girl announced that Ruthie, along with Ivy, Cécile and Marie-Grace, will be retired from their historical roster, citing business reasons as they decided "to move away from the character-friend strategy within the line". [3] [4]

A reboot of the Historical Characters line dubbed as BeForever was launched in August 2014, complete with redesigned outfits, a two-volume compilation of previously-released books, and a " Journey Book " for each character, with players taking the role of a present-day girl who found her way to the past and met up with one of the Historical girls. The line also coincided with the relaunch of Samantha Parkington , whose collection was previously discontinued in 2008. [5] [6]

Felicity Merriman is an auburn haired, horse-loving girl living in Williamsburg, Virginia , who is caught between Patriot and Loyalist family and friends at the onset of the American Revolution . Themes in her core books include loyalty and staying true to one's ideals.

Felicity is depicted as spunky, brave, and free-spirited, and is often fed up with the customs that young women are expected to observe at the time, much to her mother's disappointment. She can be a little brash, impatient and foolish sometimes, and sets her heart on things often. She is also quite outspoken, but will stand up to bullies, as she did with Jiggy Nye. Felicity also is not afraid to tease Annabelle, Elizabeth's older sister, coming up with the name "Bananabelle". She eventually learns to be more ladylike throughout the series; however, she is still quite active.

Doll Diaries and its creator are in NO WAY affiliated with American Girl, Mattel, My Twinn, or any other manufacturer. Posts may contain affiliate links or other sponsored material. All information posted is 100% our own opinion and is posted in good faith.



Meet Lanie! New American Girl Doll

American Girl is an American line of 18-inch (46 cm) dolls released in 1986 by Pleasant Company. The dolls portray eight- to eleven-year-old girls of a variety of ethnicities. They are sold with accompanying books told from the viewpoint of the girls. Originally the stories focused on various periods of American history, but were expanded in 1995 to include contemporary characters and stories, the latest addition being WellieWishers, a line of 14.5-inch (37 cm) dolls aimed for younger children.

The BeForever characters (originally known as "The American Girls Collection" or, colloquially, "Historical Characters") were initially the main focus of Pleasant Company. This product line aims to teach aspects of American history through a six book series from the perspective of a nine-year-old girl living in that time period. Although the books are written for the eight-to-thirteen-year-old target market, they endeavor to cover topics such as child labor , child abuse , poverty , racism , slavery , alcoholism , animal abuse , and war in manners appropriate for the understanding and sensibilities of the company's target market. [1]

The first dolls in the American Girl/Historical line (Samantha, Kirsten and Molly) shared the same face mold but had different hair and eye colors. The first dolls were created with white muslin bodies, but these cloth bodies were changed in 1991 from a white muslin to a matching flesh tone. This accommodated the low necklines of Late Colonial/Revolutionary period gowns produced for the Felicity Merriman character (also introduced in 1991). Additional face molds were later developed for other dolls, and the line to date includes ten characters covering the period 1764 to 1974.

The "Best Friends" line was introduced in 2004; supplemental characters from the core book series were created in doll form and marketed as "best friends" for some of the Historical Characters. These Best Friend dolls share the collections of the main characters, but each has her own book, and additional products were marketed under their names. [2] However, in May 2014, American Girl announced that Ruthie, along with Ivy, Cécile and Marie-Grace, will be retired from their historical roster, citing business reasons as they decided "to move away from the character-friend strategy within the line". [3] [4]

A reboot of the Historical Characters line dubbed as BeForever was launched in August 2014, complete with redesigned outfits, a two-volume compilation of previously-released books, and a " Journey Book " for each character, with players taking the role of a present-day girl who found her way to the past and met up with one of the Historical girls. The line also coincided with the relaunch of Samantha Parkington , whose collection was previously discontinued in 2008. [5] [6]

Felicity Merriman is an auburn haired, horse-loving girl living in Williamsburg, Virginia , who is caught between Patriot and Loyalist family and friends at the onset of the American Revolution . Themes in her core books include loyalty and staying true to one's ideals.

Felicity is depicted as spunky, brave, and free-spirited, and is often fed up with the customs that young women are expected to observe at the time, much to her mother's disappointment. She can be a little brash, impatient and foolish sometimes, and sets her heart on things often. She is also quite outspoken, but will stand up to bullies, as she did with Jiggy Nye. Felicity also is not afraid to tease Annabelle, Elizabeth's older sister, coming up with the name "Bananabelle". She eventually learns to be more ladylike throughout the series; however, she is still quite active.