Long jump training in bangalore dating

long jump training in bangalore dating

The long jump (formerly called " broad jump ") is an athletics (track and field) event in which athletes combine speed, strength, and agility in an attempt to land as far from the take-off point as possible.

There are four main components of the long jump: the approach run, the last two strides, takeoff, and action in the air and landing. Speed in the run-up, or approach, and a high leap off the board are the fundamentals of success. Because speed is such an important factor of the approach, it is unsurprising that many sprinters, notably including Carl Lewis , also compete successfully in the long jump.

The long jump was one of the events of the original Olympics in Ancient Greece. The athletes carried a weight in each hand, which were called halteres . These weights would be swung forward as the athlete jumped, in order to increase momentum, and then thrown backwards whilst in mid-air, so as to help the jumper propel himself further forward. Most notable in the ancient sport was a man called Chionis , who in the 656BC Olympics staged a jump which was equal to 7 meters and 5 centimeters (23 feet and 1.5 inches) [2] .

The long jump has been part of modern Olympic competition since the inception of the Games in 1896 . In 1914 , Dr. Harry Eaton Stewart recommended the “running broad jump” as a standardized track and field event for women [3] . However, it was not until 1928 that women were allowed to compete in the event at the Olympic level (See Athletics - track and field ).

The objective of the approach is to gradually accelerate to a maximum controlled speed at takeoff. Observing the laws of Physics , the two most important factors for the distance traveled by an object are the angle and velocity at takeoff. Elite jumpers usually leave the ground at an angle of twenty degrees or less; therefore, it is more beneficial for a jumper to focus on the velocity component of the jump. The greater the velocity, or speed, at takeoff, the higher and longer the trajectory of the center of mass will be. The importance of a higher velocity at takeoff is a major factor in the success rate for many sprinters in this event.

The length of the approach is generally a precise distance for each athlete. Approaches can vary between 12 and 19 strides on the novice and intermediate levels, while at the elite level they are closer to between 20 and 22 strides. The exact distance and number of strides in an approach will depend on the individual jumper’s experience, sprinting technique, and conditioning level. Consistency in the approach is important as it is the competitor’s objective to get as close to the front of the takeoff board as possible without crossing the line with any part of the foot.

Inconsistent approaches are a common problem in the event. As a result they are generally practiced often by athletes, approximately 6-8 times per jumping session (see Training below).

If you are here at Verticaljumping.com it is safe to say you are interested in learning how to jump higher. Well, you have come to the right place. On this site you will find everything you need to know about vertical jump training.

While there is a plethora of free jump training information available, if you want to increase your vertical jump as fast as possible you really need to check out our brand new jump training book Game Changers .

Game Changers is unlike ANY other jump training book. It isn't a jump program either. It is SO MUCH MORE than a jump program. It is quite literally the very best jump training methods known to man.


The techniques in the book have been thoroughly tested by both scientific research and coaches and athletes out in the field. They work consistently and they work well.

Simply put, if you really want to rapidly increase your vertical jump than checking out a copy of Game Changers is the FIRST place you should visit.

So whether you are a weekend warrior just wanting to impress your friends, or an athlete of the more serious kind, you will find plenty of useful information that will help make your jumping ability the envy of friends, teammates, and opponents alike.

The long jump (historically called the broad jump ) is a track and field event in which athletes combine speed, strength, and agility in an attempt to leap as far as possible from a take off point. Along with the triple jump , the two events that measure jumping for distance as a group are referred to as the "horizontal jumps". This event has a history in the Ancient Olympic Games and has been a modern Olympic event for men since the first Olympics in 1896 and for women since 1948.

There has been some argument by modern scholars over the long jump. Some have attempted to recreate it as a triple jump . The images provide the only evidence for the action so it is more well received that it was much like today's long jump. The main reason some want to call it a triple jump is the presence of a source that claims there once was a fifty-five ancient foot jump done by a man named Phayllos. [6]

The long jump has been part of modern Olympic competition since the inception of the Games in 1896. In 1914, Dr. Harry Eaton Stewart recommended the "running broad jump" as a standardized track and field event for women. [7] However, it was not until 1948 that the women's long jump was added to the Olympic athletics programme .

There are five main components of the long jump: the approach run, the last two strides, takeoff, action in the air, and landing. Speed in the run-up, or approach, and a high leap off the board are the fundamentals of success. Because speed is such an important factor of the approach, it is not surprising that many long jumpers also compete successfully in sprints. A classic example of this long jump / sprint doubling are performances by Carl Lewis .

The objective of the approach is to gradually accelerate to a maximum controlled speed at takeoff. The most important factor for the distance travelled by an object is its velocity at takeoff – both the speed and angle. Elite jumpers usually leave the ground at an angle of twenty degrees or less; therefore, it is more beneficial for a jumper to focus on the speed component of the jump. The greater the speed at takeoff, the longer the trajectory of the center of mass will be. The importance of a takeoff speed is a factor in the success of sprinters in this event.

The length of the approach is usually consistent distance for an athlete. Approaches can vary between 12 and 19 strides on the novice and intermediate levels, while at the elite level they are closer to between 20 and 22 strides. The exact distance and number of strides in an approach depends on the jumper's experience, sprinting technique, and conditioning level. Consistency in the approach is important as it is the competitor's objective to get as close to the front of the takeoff board as possible without crossing the line with any part of the foot.

Inconsistent approaches are a common problem in the event. As a result, the approach is usually practiced by athletes about 6–8 times per jumping session (see Training below).



TRAINING FOR HORIZONTAL JUMPS AND COMBINED EVENTS

If you are here at Verticaljumping.com it is safe to say you are interested in learning how to jump higher. Well, you have come to the right place. On this site you will find everything you need to know about vertical jump training.

While there is a plethora of free jump training information available, if you want to increase your vertical jump as fast as possible you really need to check out our brand new jump training book Game Changers .

Game Changers is unlike ANY other jump training book. It isn't a jump program either. It is SO MUCH MORE than a jump program. It is quite literally the very best jump training methods known to man.


The techniques in the book have been thoroughly tested by both scientific research and coaches and athletes out in the field. They work consistently and they work well.

Simply put, if you really want to rapidly increase your vertical jump than checking out a copy of Game Changers is the FIRST place you should visit.

So whether you are a weekend warrior just wanting to impress your friends, or an athlete of the more serious kind, you will find plenty of useful information that will help make your jumping ability the envy of friends, teammates, and opponents alike.