Eden ng our times dating



This is my daughter’s chest x-ray. Unfortunately she has contracted a disease called primary complex. Primary complex is a form of Tuberculosis, which commonly happens to young children. It is caused by infection from the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis [1]. Virtually all transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is from person to person, usually by mucous droplets that become airborne when the ill individual coughs, sneezes, laughs, sings, or even breathes [2].

Our one-year-old daughter has been in me dication for almost two months now. Prior to that, we were really worried about her poor weight gain and low appetite. It was also frustrating that we were totally clueless on what was causing it back then. In our experience, below are the symptoms she was experiencing.

During our monthly check up, Yesha’s pedia prescribed Heraclene to catch up on her weight. The pedia told us that if her weight did not improve after a month, it could be due to her weak lungs. Of course I couldn’t believe and accept it, how could an energetic, unsickly and active baby have weak lungs!

As a mom, the possibility of lung problem has made me feel down. But luckily, as I was browsing some posts on a public forum, I stumbled upon a post of one mom who had the same situation as mine. And that’s then I learned about this disease.

After a month of religiously giving Yesha Heraclene, her weight did not improve and remained the same. So pedia did a PPD skin test on her and made us return after 2 days for the reading.

After 48 hours, the reading was negative, and so pedia requested for chest x-ray. But the radiologist suggested to consider Pneumonia. So our doctor read the x-ray, but being the experienced pedia that she is and since Yesha has no bouts of cough, she diagnosed Primary Complex instead.

Below are the photos of  Yesha’s x-rays. Normally, a healthy lungs should be clean and clear. But in her x-rays below, you can easily notice the cloudiness in her lung’s  xrays.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek is retracing on foot our ancestors’ migration out of Africa and across the globe.

How are big cats coping with climate change, loss of habitat, and other trials? What makes cats the most popular pets in the world—and why does your cat do that?

Walton, Clarksdale born and bred, was leading me through the school, discussing ways the faculty is trying to help students—baked instead of fried, fruit instead of candy—most of whom have two meals a day in the lunchroom. She was wearing scrubs—standard Monday dress for teachers, to reinforce the school’s commitment to health and wellness. The student body is 91 percent African American, 7 percent white, “and three Latinos”—the remaining 2 percent. “These kids eat what they’re given, and too often it’s the sweetest, cheapest foods: cakes, creams, candy. It had to change. It was about the students,” she explained.

Take, for example, Nicholas Scurlock, who had recently begun his first year at Oakhurst Middle School. Nick, just tall enough to ride the coaster at the bigger amusement parks, had been 135 pounds going into fifth grade. “He was terrified of gym,” Principal Walton told me. “There was trouble running, trouble breathing—the kid had it all.”

I met Nick in the lunchroom, where he sat beside his mother, Warkeyie Jones, a striking 38-year-old. Jones told me she had changed her own eating habits to help herself and to serve as an example for Nick. “I used to snack on sweets all day, ’cause I sit at a desk, and what else are you going to do? But I’ve switched to celery,” she told me. “People say, ‘You’re doing it ’cause you’ve got a boyfriend.’ And I say, ‘No, I’m doing it ’cause I want to live and be healthy.’”

Take a cup of water, add sugar to the brim, let it sit for five hours. When you return, you’ll see that the crystals have settled on the bottom of the glass. Clarksdale, a big town in one of the fattest counties, in the fattest state, in the fattest industrialized nation in the world, is the bottom of the American drink, where the sugar settles in the bodies of kids like Nick Scurlock—the legacy of sweets in the shape of a boy.

Mosques of Marzipan
In the beginning, on the island of New Guinea, where sugarcane was domesticated some 10,000 years ago, people picked cane and ate it raw, chewing a stem until the taste hit their tongue like a starburst. A kind of elixir, a cure for every ailment, an answer for every mood, sugar featured prominently in ancient New Guinean myths. In one the first man makes love to a stalk of cane, yielding the human race. At religious ceremonies priests sipped sugar water from coconut shells, a beverage since replaced in sacred ceremonies with cans of Coke.

Muslim caliphs made a great show of sugar. Marzipan was the rage, ground almonds and sugar sculpted into outlandish concoctions that demonstrated the wealth of the state. A 15th-century writer described an entire marzipan mosque commissioned by a caliph. Marveled at, prayed in, devoured by the poor. The Arabs perfected sugar refinement and turned it into an industry. The work was brutally difficult. The heat of the fields, the flash of the scythes, the smoke of the boiling rooms, the crush of the mills. By 1500, with the demand for sugar surging, the work was considered suitable only for the lowest of laborers. Many of the field hands were prisoners of war, eastern Europeans captured when Muslim and Christian armies clashed.

Slaves to Sugar
Columbus planted the New World’s first sugarcane in Hispaniola, the site, not coincidentally, of the great slave revolt a few hundred years later. Within decades mills marked the heights in Jamaica and Cuba, where rain forest had been cleared and the native population eliminated by disease or war, or enslaved. The Portuguese created the most effective model, making Brazil into an early boom colony, with more than 100,000 slaves churning out tons of sugar.



Primary Complex Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and National Geographic Fellow Paul Salopek is retracing on foot our ancestors’ migration out of Africa and across the globe.

How are big cats coping with climate change, loss of habitat, and other trials? What makes cats the most popular pets in the world—and why does your cat do that?