Magdeburg centuries online dating

magdeburg centuries online dating

"Murdock's scholarship is relentless! ...the research conducted by D.M. Murdock concerning the myth of Jesus Christ is certainly both valuable and worthy of consideration." —Dr. Kenneth L. Feder, Professor of Archaeology, Central Connecticut State University, Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries: Science and Pseudoscience In Archaeology

"I find myself in full agreement with Acharya S/D.M. Murdock... I find it undeniable that...many, many of the epic heroes and ancient patriarchs and matriarchs of the Old Testament were personified stars, planets and constellations..." —Dr. Robert M. Price, The Pre-Nicene New Testament

"I can recommend your work whole-heartedly!" —Dr. Robert Eisenman, James the Brother of Jesus and The New Testament Code , RobertEisenman.com

"...I have found Murdock's scholarship, research, knowledge of the original languages, and creative linkages to be breathtaking and highly stimulating." —Rev. Dr. Jon Burnham, Pastor, Presbyterian Church, Houston, TX

"Acharya S deserves to be recognized as a leading researcher and an expert in the field of comparative mythology, on a par with James Frazer or Robert Graves—indeed, superior to those forerunners in the frankness of her conclusions and the volume of her evidence." —Barbara Walker, The Women's Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets and Man Made God

"I've known people with triple Ph.D's who haven't come close to the scholarship in Who Was Jesus? " —Pastor David Bruce, M.Div, North Park Seminary, Chicago, HollywoodJesus.com

"Thirty years ago, when in divinity school, I might have had second thoughts about becoming an Episcopal priest if a book like D. M. Murdock's Who Was Jesus? had been available to me." —Bob Semes, Retired university professor of History and Religion, Founder and Executive Director of The Jefferson Center

Water bridges are bridge-like structures that carry navigable waterway canals over other rivers, valleys, railways or roads. Small ships and boats ply on these waterways. The most popular water bridge is the Magdeburg Water Bridge in Germany, the longest and the most impressive in the world. Although aqueducts has been used for supplying cities with water since centuries, they were not generally used for traffic until the 17th century when modern canal systems started to appear. The 662-metre long aqueduct carrying the Canal latéral à la Loire over the River Loire was built in 1896, and remained the longest navigable aqueduct in the world until the 21st century, when the Magdeburg Water Bridge in Germany took the title.

The Magdeburg Water Bridge in Germany deserve special mention. Opened in October 2003 and part of the Magdeburg crossing of waterways, it connects the Elbe-Havel Canal to the Mittellandkanal, crossing over the Elbe River. At 918 meters, it’s the longest navigable aqueduct in the world.

The Elbe–Havel Canal and Mittelland Canal canals had previously met near Magdeburg but on opposite sides of the Elbe, which was at a significantly lower elevation than the two canals. Ships moving between the two had to make a 12-kilometre detour, descending from the Mittelland Canal through the Rothensee boat lift into the Elbe, then sailing downstream on the river, before ascending to the Elbe-Havel Canal through Niegripp lock. Low water levels in the Elbe often prevented fully laden canal barges from making this crossing, requiring time-consuming off-loading of cargo.

The reunification of Germany and establishment of major water transport routes made the Water Bridge a priority again. Work started in 1997, with construction taking six years and costing €500 million. The water bridge now connects Berlin’s inland harbour network with the ports along the Rhine river.

The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, in Wrexham County Borough in Britain, was built between 1795 and 1805 to carry the Ellesmere Canal over the valley of the River Dee to link the coal mines of Denbighshire to the national canal system during the Industrial Revolution. It was one of the world's greatest engineering achievements of the time. For more than 200 years, it is the longest and highest aqueduct in Britain, and currently a World Heritage Site.

The aqueduct is 307 meter long, 3.4 meter wide and 1.60 meter deep, and forms a part of an 18 km long aqueduct system. It consists of a cast iron trough supported 38 meter above the river on iron arched ribs carried on nineteen hollow masonry piers. The use of both cast and wrought iron in the aqueduct enabled the construction of arches that were light and strong, producing an overall effect that is both monumental and elegant.

The economic influence of the canal for the region was considerable during the first half of the 19th century, enabling the rapid development of coal extraction, metal working, limestone quarries, and the production of lime. The slate quarries of the Welsh mountains and agriculture also benefited from the canal. Today, the canal no longer moves coal and limestone cargoes, but is a popular spot for tourists. Since 1954 the canal has been managed and maintained in a navigable condition by British Waterways.



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Water bridges are bridge-like structures that carry navigable waterway canals over other rivers, valleys, railways or roads. Small ships and boats ply on these waterways. The most popular water bridge is the Magdeburg Water Bridge in Germany, the longest and the most impressive in the world. Although aqueducts has been used for supplying cities with water since centuries, they were not generally used for traffic until the 17th century when modern canal systems started to appear. The 662-metre long aqueduct carrying the Canal latéral à la Loire over the River Loire was built in 1896, and remained the longest navigable aqueduct in the world until the 21st century, when the Magdeburg Water Bridge in Germany took the title.

The Magdeburg Water Bridge in Germany deserve special mention. Opened in October 2003 and part of the Magdeburg crossing of waterways, it connects the Elbe-Havel Canal to the Mittellandkanal, crossing over the Elbe River. At 918 meters, it’s the longest navigable aqueduct in the world.

The Elbe–Havel Canal and Mittelland Canal canals had previously met near Magdeburg but on opposite sides of the Elbe, which was at a significantly lower elevation than the two canals. Ships moving between the two had to make a 12-kilometre detour, descending from the Mittelland Canal through the Rothensee boat lift into the Elbe, then sailing downstream on the river, before ascending to the Elbe-Havel Canal through Niegripp lock. Low water levels in the Elbe often prevented fully laden canal barges from making this crossing, requiring time-consuming off-loading of cargo.

The reunification of Germany and establishment of major water transport routes made the Water Bridge a priority again. Work started in 1997, with construction taking six years and costing €500 million. The water bridge now connects Berlin’s inland harbour network with the ports along the Rhine river.

The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, in Wrexham County Borough in Britain, was built between 1795 and 1805 to carry the Ellesmere Canal over the valley of the River Dee to link the coal mines of Denbighshire to the national canal system during the Industrial Revolution. It was one of the world's greatest engineering achievements of the time. For more than 200 years, it is the longest and highest aqueduct in Britain, and currently a World Heritage Site.

The aqueduct is 307 meter long, 3.4 meter wide and 1.60 meter deep, and forms a part of an 18 km long aqueduct system. It consists of a cast iron trough supported 38 meter above the river on iron arched ribs carried on nineteen hollow masonry piers. The use of both cast and wrought iron in the aqueduct enabled the construction of arches that were light and strong, producing an overall effect that is both monumental and elegant.

The economic influence of the canal for the region was considerable during the first half of the 19th century, enabling the rapid development of coal extraction, metal working, limestone quarries, and the production of lime. The slate quarries of the Welsh mountains and agriculture also benefited from the canal. Today, the canal no longer moves coal and limestone cargoes, but is a popular spot for tourists. Since 1954 the canal has been managed and maintained in a navigable condition by British Waterways.