Seinfeld george dating convict

seinfeld george dating convict

After George's mother catches him alone in a somewhat embarrassing situation, Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer stage a contest to see who can last the longest without any sexual gratification...

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George decides to turn his life around by doing the exact opposite of what he would usually do. Elaine is having a lot of bad luck. Jerry keeps breaking even. Kramer gets the coffee table book ...

9.6 Rate this     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9.6 / 10 X  

9.6 Rate this     1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 9.6 / 10 X  

Level-headed son Michael Bluth takes over family affairs after his father is imprisoned. But the rest of his spoiled, dysfunctional family are making his job unbearable.

A mockumentary on a group of typical office workers, where the workday consists of ego clashes, inappropriate behavior, and tedium. Based on the hit BBC series.

4. “ The Beard ,” gay issues (season six)
Elaine tries to convert a gay man to heterosexuality after serving as his decoy date to a work function. She’s sure she can get him to “change teams,” as she tells Jerry, though he cautions that gay men are only comfortable with “their equipment.” Where “The Outing” dealt with straight guys being mistaken for gay, the gay character in “The Beard” is enticed to go straight as one of the main characters plays out the “what not to do” scenario as usual. (Elaine is unsuccessful in her team-switching efforts.) In the process,  Seinfeld  gifts the world with another go-to way to discuss the issue at hand—“switching teams.”

5. “ The Sponge ,” birth control (season season)
Elaine panics (and hoards) when she hears that her favorite form of contraception, the Today Sponge, is being discontinued. This leads to a supply-and-demand problem in her sex life, causing her to carefully interview candidates before declaring them “sponge-worthy” and leading them to the bedroom. (Future  Gilmore Girls star Scott Patterson agrees to trim his sideburns before getting bedroom access.) The episode wraps Elaine’s transgressively feminist qualities up in a nutshell: She’s allowed to be as crass, unfeeling, and sexual as the guys throughout the run of the show. Even now, it’s hard to imagine a network TV show that would dedicate an entire episode to female contraception.

6. “ The Merv Griffin Show ,” date rape (season nine)
A weird, not-often-cited episode from the show’s later days, “The Merv Griffin Show” includes a subplot that’s a veiled commentary on date rape: Jerry repeatedly gets his new girlfriend drunk and has her eat turkey so she’ll pass out post-Thanksgiving style—because she has a vintage toy collection that she otherwise won’t let him touch. It gets extra creepy when Jerry allows George to come with him to play with the toys. One could imagine viewers not even catching on to the unsettling overtones until Kramer denounces the scheme: “Wait a minute! You mean to say that you drugged a woman so you could take advantage of her toys?”

8. “ The Cheever Letters ,” gay issues (season four)
Perhaps the most subversive (though subtle) part of this episode is what goes unspoken later. In a show that pioneered audience-pleasing continuity among episodes, drawing out references and subplots for years, no consequences are evident after the affair exposed in “The Cheever Letters”—a long-ago liaison between novelist John Cheever and Mr. Ross, the father of George’s girlfriend, Susan. When the Ross’ return—three seasons later, during George and Susan’s engagement—they’re as together, traditional, and WASPy as ever. They’re either so repressed that they couldn’t even talk about the Cheever incident, or they’re very progressive. They did, after all, raise a bisexual daughter .

9. “ The Dinner Party ,” racism (season five)
While trying to pick up a babka to bring to a dinner party, Jerry and Elaine wax pseudo-philosophical about the racial implications of the black-and-white cookie: “Look to the cookie, Elaine, look to the cookie.” It may be the only time  Seinfeld  laid out a clear moral position. Alas, it was both tongue-in-cheek and naively optimistic.

10. “ The Wizard ,” interracial dating (season nine)
Elaine dates Darryl, a guy who may be black, and she’s vexed by the uncertainty. Finally, he refers to their being an “interracial couple,” leaving Elaine thrilled by the liberal cachet it confers. Soon, though, he reveals that he thought they were “interracial” because he thought she was Hispanic. Both are clearly disappointed. As Elaine says, “So we’re just a couple of white people?” After all of  Seinfeld ’s awkward dealings with race, this final-season episode found yet another interesting angle not just in interracial dating, but the hipness factor associated with it in the late ’90s in progressive places like New York City. Tellingly, we never saw Darryl again after finding out he was white.

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong  is working on a history of  Seinfeld , to be published next year by Simon & Schuster. She’s the author of   Mary And Lou And Rhoda And Ted , a history of  The Mary Tyler Moore Show .

Father: Frank Costanza
Brother: Unnamed Brother
Cousins: Shelly & Rhisa
Uncle: Uncle Moe
Aunt: Aunt Baby
First Cousin Once-removed: Henny
Grandfather: Unnamed Grandfather

George is Jerry's neurotic friend. He sometimes lives with his parents, Estelle and Frank Costanza , a bitter couple who are as neurotic as their son. Chances are George's personality traits of being bitter, miserly, selfish, greedy and dishonest come from his childhood background. As a teenager, he was tormented by his gym teacher, Mr. Heyman , who intentionally mispronounced George's last name as "Can't Stand Ya." George and Jerry attended public school together, setting the dynamic for their later relationship. George claims that he and Jerry met in gym class when George, climbing rope, fell on Jerry.

George has numerous psychological problems, including: sociopathy, narcissism, habitual lying, low self-esteem, sudden fits of anger, hypochondriasis, impulsive acts of ill-considered cheapness, selfishness, obsessiveness, living in fantasy. Like Kramer , he would often concoct elaborate plots to weasel out of relational, financial, or legal obligations, always with unexpected and negative consequences. George's lying, however, is often seen as a gift in the eyes of himself and his friends. It is noted in some episodes that he can even beat a lie-detector test. When Jerry tells Elaine about his plan of beating a lie detector instead of somehow avoiding it, she replies, "Who do you think you are, Costanza?"

Unlike Jerry, George is never specifically identified as Jewish (or any other religion), but according to some hints given in the show, it is most likely that he is Catholic. Larry David once claimed in an interview that George is half-Jewish/half-Italian, although that could merely be ethnicity. If this is the case, then the obvious conclusion to draw is that Estelle is the Jewish half of the equation; as the name "Costanza" comes from Frank, he hails from Tuscany and all references to the possible Catholicism of the Costanza family are due to aspects of Frank, not Estelle.

It is revealed Frank has relatives in Italy, and lived in Italy for part of his early childhood. Additionally, in " The Calzone ", George points out that Costanza is Italian, and that he and the Paisano's clerk are like family because of that. The primary religion in Italy is Roman Catholicism.

Newman | Ruthie Cohen | Morty Seinfeld | Helen Seinfeld | Frank Costanza | Estelle Costanza | Uncle Leo | Babs Kramer | David Puddy | Tim Whatley | Kenny Bania | Lloyd Braun | Jackie Chiles | Jacopo Peterman | Justin Pitt | George Steinbrenner | Mr. Wilhelm | Mr. Morgan
See also: Minor characters in Seinfeld

George Louis Costanza is a character in the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander . He has variously been described as a " short, stocky, slow-witted, bald man " (by Elaine Benes and Costanza himself ) and " Lord of the Idiots " (by Costanza himself). George and Jerry were junior high school friends and remained friends afterwards. [1] [2] He is friends with Jerry Seinfeld , Cosmo Kramer , and Elaine Benes . George appears in every episode except " The Pen " (third season).

The character was originally based on Seinfeld co-creator Larry David but is surnamed after Jerry Seinfeld's real-life New York friend, Mike Costanza. Alexander reprised his role in an episode of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee , reuniting with Jerry Seinfeld and Wayne Knight (also reprising their roles as Jerry and Newman, respectively).

George is the son of Frank ( Jerry Stiller ) and Estelle Costanza ( Estelle Harris ). Though he never made an appearance on the show, George has mentioned twice that he has a brother. Lloyd Braun is his childhood nemesis who George feels was the son his parents always wanted. [3] [4] George's best friend Jerry Seinfeld described Frank and Estelle as " psychopaths ", [5] and said in " The Chinese Woman " that, if they'd divorced when George was young, he "could have been normal". [6] George also describes himself (and by implication many neuroses) as the result of his parents having stayed together. [7]

In " The Junior Mint ", he states he grew up in Brooklyn, New York , where he went to a public school. [8] In a previous episode he mentions he went to high school on Long Island . [9] He met Jerry during his youth, and they remained friends from that point on. [10] George and Jerry both attended John F. Kennedy High School, class of 1971. [11] During their high school years, George and Jerry frequently hung out at a pizzeria called Mario's Pizzas, where the former, having the highest score 'GLC', would play Frogger . [12] George was picked on by his gym teacher Mr. Heyman ( Biff Yeager ), who deliberately mispronounced his name as "Can't stand ya" and gave him wedgies . [13]

George has three known cousins: Shelly, who appeared in " The Contest ", [14] George Howarth and Rhisa, who appears in " The Junk Mail ". [15] George talks to his parents about his family in " The Money ", during which it's revealed that he had an "Uncle Moe", who "died a young man" and an "Aunt Baby", who died at the age seven of internal problems. [16] It is also revealed that his mother has a "Cousin Henny". [16] In " The Doll ", it's revealed that Frank Costanza was born in Italy and has a cousin, Carlo, who still lives there. [17] As of " The Robbery ", George had living grandparents who he'd recently visited, although it's never made clear whether these were his mom's or dad's parents. [18]

George is neurotic , self-loathing and dominated by his parents, yet also prone to occasional periods of overconfidence that invariably arise at the worst possible time. Throughout Seinfeld ' s first season , George is depicted as moderately intelligent – at one point, he mentions an intellectual interest in the Civil War and, in some early episodes, appears almost as a mentor to Jerry – but becomes less sophisticated, to the point of being too lazy even to read a ninety-page book ( Breakfast at Tiffany's ), preferring to watch the movie adaptation at a stranger's house instead. However, one Chicago Tribune reviewer noted that, despite all his shortcomings, George is "pretty content with himself". [19]

George sometimes refers to himself in the third person (for example, "George is getting UPSET!"), after befriending a person with a similar trait in " The Jimmy ".



George Costanza s Bad Date

4. “ The Beard ,” gay issues (season six)
Elaine tries to convert a gay man to heterosexuality after serving as his decoy date to a work function. She’s sure she can get him to “change teams,” as she tells Jerry, though he cautions that gay men are only comfortable with “their equipment.” Where “The Outing” dealt with straight guys being mistaken for gay, the gay character in “The Beard” is enticed to go straight as one of the main characters plays out the “what not to do” scenario as usual. (Elaine is unsuccessful in her team-switching efforts.) In the process,  Seinfeld  gifts the world with another go-to way to discuss the issue at hand—“switching teams.”

5. “ The Sponge ,” birth control (season season)
Elaine panics (and hoards) when she hears that her favorite form of contraception, the Today Sponge, is being discontinued. This leads to a supply-and-demand problem in her sex life, causing her to carefully interview candidates before declaring them “sponge-worthy” and leading them to the bedroom. (Future  Gilmore Girls star Scott Patterson agrees to trim his sideburns before getting bedroom access.) The episode wraps Elaine’s transgressively feminist qualities up in a nutshell: She’s allowed to be as crass, unfeeling, and sexual as the guys throughout the run of the show. Even now, it’s hard to imagine a network TV show that would dedicate an entire episode to female contraception.

6. “ The Merv Griffin Show ,” date rape (season nine)
A weird, not-often-cited episode from the show’s later days, “The Merv Griffin Show” includes a subplot that’s a veiled commentary on date rape: Jerry repeatedly gets his new girlfriend drunk and has her eat turkey so she’ll pass out post-Thanksgiving style—because she has a vintage toy collection that she otherwise won’t let him touch. It gets extra creepy when Jerry allows George to come with him to play with the toys. One could imagine viewers not even catching on to the unsettling overtones until Kramer denounces the scheme: “Wait a minute! You mean to say that you drugged a woman so you could take advantage of her toys?”

8. “ The Cheever Letters ,” gay issues (season four)
Perhaps the most subversive (though subtle) part of this episode is what goes unspoken later. In a show that pioneered audience-pleasing continuity among episodes, drawing out references and subplots for years, no consequences are evident after the affair exposed in “The Cheever Letters”—a long-ago liaison between novelist John Cheever and Mr. Ross, the father of George’s girlfriend, Susan. When the Ross’ return—three seasons later, during George and Susan’s engagement—they’re as together, traditional, and WASPy as ever. They’re either so repressed that they couldn’t even talk about the Cheever incident, or they’re very progressive. They did, after all, raise a bisexual daughter .

9. “ The Dinner Party ,” racism (season five)
While trying to pick up a babka to bring to a dinner party, Jerry and Elaine wax pseudo-philosophical about the racial implications of the black-and-white cookie: “Look to the cookie, Elaine, look to the cookie.” It may be the only time  Seinfeld  laid out a clear moral position. Alas, it was both tongue-in-cheek and naively optimistic.

10. “ The Wizard ,” interracial dating (season nine)
Elaine dates Darryl, a guy who may be black, and she’s vexed by the uncertainty. Finally, he refers to their being an “interracial couple,” leaving Elaine thrilled by the liberal cachet it confers. Soon, though, he reveals that he thought they were “interracial” because he thought she was Hispanic. Both are clearly disappointed. As Elaine says, “So we’re just a couple of white people?” After all of  Seinfeld ’s awkward dealings with race, this final-season episode found yet another interesting angle not just in interracial dating, but the hipness factor associated with it in the late ’90s in progressive places like New York City. Tellingly, we never saw Darryl again after finding out he was white.

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong  is working on a history of  Seinfeld , to be published next year by Simon & Schuster. She’s the author of   Mary And Lou And Rhoda And Ted , a history of  The Mary Tyler Moore Show .