Cross dating involves crossword

cross dating involves crossword

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T here are some myths out there that people assume to be gospel about dating. Christian culture is like any other in that we develop truisms that we accept without verifying. There are things floating around that have little or nothing to do with the Bible . Most are well intended and contain a nugget of truth. Some are flat–out wrong. Dating is hard enough without sifting through all this erroneous information, so let's debunk some myths. There are plenty of them, but let's focus on what I believe are the top five myths that make dating harder for Christian men.

Good luck finding this one in the Bible. There is plenty of stuff about God's will for his people, God wanting good things for you, and God's ultimate plan. Nowhere, however, does it say that God picked out a spunky brunette whom he's waiting to spring on you at the right moment. I'm not saying that he doesn't. When it comes to God, I'm pretty careful about saying what he does or doesn't do. But I do know this—if you rely on this idea too much, your dating life will get really confusing.

Some Christians take a lot of comfort in the idea that God will do the heavy lifting when it comes to dating. God will tell them if a relationship is right, and God will end it if it's not. All they have to do is sit back and enjoy the ride. This may be the biggest excuse men use for being lazy in relationships, much less finding one.

German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer addresses this issue in a wedding sermon he wrote for his sister from a Nazi jail cell. He says that God joins the relationship between a man and a woman at the point of marriage . Before that, the couple has to take the initiative. Rather than directing the course of the relationship, God wants the couple to grow and learn how to make a commitment. Once they've done that, God increases his sustaining presence.

I'm not saying that God doesn't have a will regarding your dating life. God may, in fact, have a spunky brunette in mind, and he's steering you toward her as you read this. But the Bible does not promise that God will provide a loving relationship for you while you sit around and do nothing. But, as in all things, it's best to ask for his guidance. The Bible promises he will provide that whenever we ask. Rely on God's love, wisdom, and sustaining presence while you're dating. Though God won't do all the work for you, he'll be with you every step of the way.

The good news is that most men don't have a problem with this. Regardless of your theology on the Predestination of Girlfriends, you're probably eager to be an active participant in your dating life. This brings us to our next myth.

Cross contamination is a fancy name for bacteria on one thing getting onto another thing via direct contact. In the culinary arts, one of the things usually tends to be a knife or a cutting board, and the other thing is food.

And it's not just bacteria . It could be a virus or a toxin of some kind, or even a cleaning product. But whatever it is, if it comes into contact with someone's food, it's cross contamination. If they eat the food and it makes them sick, we call it food poisoning . 

Cross contamination can happen on a very large scale, because of equipment at processing facilities not being cleaned properly, for instance, or any of the other numerous and sundry ways your food can be mishandled as it makes its way to you.

That is why from time to time we all read about outbreaks of food poisoning, product recalls, restaurant closures and the like. And unfortunately, there's not much you can do to protect yourself at that level, other than keeping track of the news and using good sense in deciding where to eat out.

As a home cook, though, there are quite a few steps you can take and habits you can build, to help reduce the likelihood of cross-contamination in your kitchen.

In nearly all cases, cross contamination is going to be caused either by your kitchen knife, your cutting board, or your hands. But once it's on your hands,  it's on everything else as well.

Those two items really are the major culprits, since everything touches your cutting board , especially if you're planning on cutting it, which is where the knife comes in. Cutting up food on cutting boards is, after all, a big part of cooking.

Cross-Price Elasticity of Demand (sometimes called simply "Cross Elasticity of Demand) is an expression of the degree to which the demand for one product -- let's call this Product A -- changes when the price of Product B changes. Stated in the abstract, this might seem a little difficult to grasp, but an example or two makes the concept clear -- it's not difficult. 

Assume for a moment you've been lucky enough to get in on the ground floor of the Greek Yogurt craze. Your greek yogurt product B, is immensely popular, allowing you to increase the single cup price from around $0.90 a cup to $1.50 a cup. Now, in fact, you may continue to do well, but at least some persons will revert back to the good old non-Greek yogurt (Product A) at the $.090/cup price. By changing the price of Product B you've increased the demand for Product A, even though they're not highly similar products. (In fact, they can be quite similar or quite different -- the essential point is that there will often be some correlation, strong, weak or even negative between the demand for one product when the price of another changes.

If you've been following this series of articles on different aspects of elasticity, you'll remember that the first article, A Beginners Guide to Elasticity, " laid out the general idea of elasticity in economics and noted that  demand for a common product, like aspirin, was very sensitive to price. Even a slight increase in one manufacturer's aspirin product increases the demand for the same product offered at a lower price by other manufacturers because there are many aspirin brands and most are pharmaceutically identical. In other instances, however, the demand for one product may go down when the price of another increases. 

The aspirin example shows what happens to the demand for good B when the price of good A increases. Manufacturer A's price having increased, demand for its aspirin product (for which there are many substitute goods)  decreases.

Since aspirin is so widely available, there probably won't be a great increase in each of these many other brands; however in instances where there are only a few substitutes, or perhaps only one, the demand increase may be marked.

A local Seattle band has a breakthrough hit -- millions and millions of streams, many, many downloads and a  hundred thousand albums sold, all in a few weeks. The band begins touring and in response to demand, ticket prices begin climbing. But now something interesting happens: as the ticket prices increase, the audience becomes smaller -- no problem so far because what's happening essentially is that the band is playing smaller venues but at greatly increased ticket prices -- still a win. But then, the band's management sees a problem. As the audience grows smaller, so do the sales of all those high mark-up collectibles -- band T-shirts, coffee mugs, photo albums and so on: the "merch."

Our Seattle band has more than doubled the ticket price at $60.00 and is still selling about half as many tickets at each venue.  So far so good: 500 tickets times $60.00 is more money than 1,000 tickets times $25.00. However, the band had enjoyed robust merch sales averaging $35 a head. Now the equation looks a little different: 500 tix x $(60.00 + $35.00) is less than 1,000 tix x ($25.00+35). The drop in ticket sales at a higher price created a proportionate drop in merch sales. The two products are complementary. As the price increases for band tickets, the demand for band merch drops. 

Understanding the influences and misunderstandings that come from crossed signals is the key to happier, more successful college friendships. Dating rituals and expectations for casual friendships are shaped by where we come from as well.

When I was first dating my husband, he was an international student from Nicaragua studying in Canada. His customs dictated a very slow, but intentional approach to finding, wooing and keeping a significant other. 

He never officially asked me out using a variation of the question, "Would you like to be my girlfriend?" Instead, he told me that he was having a lot of fun spending time with me and would like to get to know me better. 

Having said that and having me agree was enough in his mind to establish our exclusivity as a couple. If he hadn't kissed me right after, we could have "dated" for months and I would never have known it! 

Since coming to the U.S., I've had several friends encounter the same uncertainty when it comes to relationships. Because of cultural differences, they view and value dating in ways students born and bred in the U.S. may not. 

College relationships are a part of the study-abroad experience, but to avoid some of the embarrassment and misunderstanding that is inherent in intercultural relationships, there are a few things to keep in mind. 

1. Dating can be many things, even accidental.  North American culture cultivates an understanding of dating that involves both spending time together and shared activities. While one or the other of these options does not necessarily imply a committed dating relationship, you may have some questions to answer if you participate in both. 



Archaeology Wordsmith

Cross contamination is a fancy name for bacteria on one thing getting onto another thing via direct contact. In the culinary arts, one of the things usually tends to be a knife or a cutting board, and the other thing is food.

And it's not just bacteria . It could be a virus or a toxin of some kind, or even a cleaning product. But whatever it is, if it comes into contact with someone's food, it's cross contamination. If they eat the food and it makes them sick, we call it food poisoning . 

Cross contamination can happen on a very large scale, because of equipment at processing facilities not being cleaned properly, for instance, or any of the other numerous and sundry ways your food can be mishandled as it makes its way to you.

That is why from time to time we all read about outbreaks of food poisoning, product recalls, restaurant closures and the like. And unfortunately, there's not much you can do to protect yourself at that level, other than keeping track of the news and using good sense in deciding where to eat out.

As a home cook, though, there are quite a few steps you can take and habits you can build, to help reduce the likelihood of cross-contamination in your kitchen.

In nearly all cases, cross contamination is going to be caused either by your kitchen knife, your cutting board, or your hands. But once it's on your hands,  it's on everything else as well.

Those two items really are the major culprits, since everything touches your cutting board , especially if you're planning on cutting it, which is where the knife comes in. Cutting up food on cutting boards is, after all, a big part of cooking.