Norms of dating in court

norms of dating in court

Johannesburg - Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga could again be dragged before the courts for failing to provide basic amenities to schools, following years of promises and legal wrangling.

Tuesday is the deadline for the Department of Basic Education to meet the norms and standards for school infrastructure provision, but few of the nine provincial departments look set to meet the target.

The norms and standards are legally binding, and all the provinces were required to meet the three-year deadline, stipulating that all schools have water, sanitation and electricity. Schools made from asbestos, wood and other makeshift material should be eradicated.

Another deadline - set for seven years - includes electronic connectivity and the installation of security around schools. All schools should have libraries and laboratories in 10 years, and sports fields and walkways should be provided by 2017.

Equal Education (EE), which has for five years lobbied and protested to force the department to ensure schools were safe and habitable, is not taking the matter lying down. It has vowed to take legal action against Motshekga.

“She (Motshekga) has to be held responsible because government departments are mandated to work together... She cannot want to now cut these (departments) into pieces (just) so she can’t be held responsible,” Draga said.

After attempting to meet Motshekga for two years to change some of the regulations, the EE Law Centre in May launched an application in the Bhisho High Court asking her to fix the issues with the provisions.

Courtship is the period in a couple's relationship which precedes their engagement and marriage , or establishment of an agreed relationship of a more enduring kind. During courtship, a couple get to know each other and decide if there will be an engagement or other such agreement. A courtship may be an informal and private matter between two people or may be a public affair, or a formal arrangement with family approval. Traditionally, in the case of a formal engagement, it has been perceived that it is the role of a male to actively "court" or "woo" a female, thus encouraging her to understand him and her receptiveness to a proposal of marriage.

The average duration of courtship varies considerably throughout the world. Furthermore, there is vast individual variation between couples. Courtship may be completely omitted, as in cases of some arranged marriages where the couple do not meet before the wedding.

In the United Kingdom , a poll of 3,000 [1] engaged or married couples resulted in an average duration between first meeting and accepted proposal of marriage of 2 years and 11 months, [1] [2] with the women feeling ready to accept at an average of 2 years and 7 months. [1] Regarding duration between proposal and wedding, the UK poll above gave an average of 2 years and 3 months. [2]

While the date is fairly casual in most European-influenced cultures, in some traditional societies, courtship is a highly structured activity, with very specific formal rules.

In some societies, the parents or community propose potential partners, and then allow limited dating to determine whether the parties are suited. In Japan , there is a such type of courtship called Omiai , with similar practices called "Xiangqin" (相親) in the Greater China Area . [3] Parents will hire a matchmaker to provide pictures and résumés of potential mates, and if the couple agrees, there will be a formal meeting with the matchmaker and often parents in attendance. [3] The matchmaker and parents will often exert pressure on the couple to decide whether they want to marry or not after a few dates.

Courtship in the Philippines is one known complex form of courtship. Unlike what is regularly seen in other societies, it takes a far more subdued and indirect approach. [4] It is complex in that it involves stages, and it is considered normal for courtship to last a year or longer. It is common to see the male showing off by sending love letters and love poems, singing romantic songs and buying gifts for the female. [5] The parents are also seen as part of the courtship practice, as their approval is commonly needed before courtship may begin, or before the female gives the male an answer to his advances. [4]

In more closed societies, courtship is virtually eliminated altogether by the practice of arranged marriages , [3] where partners are chosen for young people, typically by their parents. Forbidding experimental and serial courtship and sanctioning only arranged matches is partly a means of guarding the chastity of young people and partly a matter of furthering family interests, which in such cultures may be considered more important than individual romantic preferences.

A Dutch court has ruled that a priceless collection of gold artifacts from Crimea that were on loan to a Dutch museum when Russia occupied the peninsula must be returned to Ukraine.

Kyiv and four museums in Crimea have been wrangling over the fate of the archeological treasures, which range from pots to a Scythian helmet dating back more than 2,000 years, ever since Russia seized control of the Ukrainian peninsula in March 2014.

The Ukrainian government claimed that, as state property, they could not be returned to territory outside its control, while the Crimean museums argued the objects must be returned by the Netherlands to the institutions from which they were on loan.

The treasures, popularly known as Scythian gold, are in the Netherlands because they were borrowed from the four museums in Crimea and one in Kyiv for an exhibition in early 2014 at Amsterdam's Allard Pierson Museum.

"The court ruling is that the artifacts have to be brought back to the state of Ukraine as they form a part of the cultural heritage of the state of Ukraine," Illya Bilderbeek, a spokesman for the Amsterdam district court, said.

Shortly after the court issued its ruling, the Russian Culture Ministry said the decision "violates the principles of international exchanges between museums and the right of the people of the Crimea to have access to their own cultural heritage."

The ministry called the ruling an "extremely negative precedent" and said it contradicted "the norms of international law on the protection of cultural values."



Dating and Courtship – God’s Way

Courtship is the period in a couple's relationship which precedes their engagement and marriage , or establishment of an agreed relationship of a more enduring kind. During courtship, a couple get to know each other and decide if there will be an engagement or other such agreement. A courtship may be an informal and private matter between two people or may be a public affair, or a formal arrangement with family approval. Traditionally, in the case of a formal engagement, it has been perceived that it is the role of a male to actively "court" or "woo" a female, thus encouraging her to understand him and her receptiveness to a proposal of marriage.

The average duration of courtship varies considerably throughout the world. Furthermore, there is vast individual variation between couples. Courtship may be completely omitted, as in cases of some arranged marriages where the couple do not meet before the wedding.

In the United Kingdom , a poll of 3,000 [1] engaged or married couples resulted in an average duration between first meeting and accepted proposal of marriage of 2 years and 11 months, [1] [2] with the women feeling ready to accept at an average of 2 years and 7 months. [1] Regarding duration between proposal and wedding, the UK poll above gave an average of 2 years and 3 months. [2]

While the date is fairly casual in most European-influenced cultures, in some traditional societies, courtship is a highly structured activity, with very specific formal rules.

In some societies, the parents or community propose potential partners, and then allow limited dating to determine whether the parties are suited. In Japan , there is a such type of courtship called Omiai , with similar practices called "Xiangqin" (相親) in the Greater China Area . [3] Parents will hire a matchmaker to provide pictures and résumés of potential mates, and if the couple agrees, there will be a formal meeting with the matchmaker and often parents in attendance. [3] The matchmaker and parents will often exert pressure on the couple to decide whether they want to marry or not after a few dates.

Courtship in the Philippines is one known complex form of courtship. Unlike what is regularly seen in other societies, it takes a far more subdued and indirect approach. [4] It is complex in that it involves stages, and it is considered normal for courtship to last a year or longer. It is common to see the male showing off by sending love letters and love poems, singing romantic songs and buying gifts for the female. [5] The parents are also seen as part of the courtship practice, as their approval is commonly needed before courtship may begin, or before the female gives the male an answer to his advances. [4]

In more closed societies, courtship is virtually eliminated altogether by the practice of arranged marriages , [3] where partners are chosen for young people, typically by their parents. Forbidding experimental and serial courtship and sanctioning only arranged matches is partly a means of guarding the chastity of young people and partly a matter of furthering family interests, which in such cultures may be considered more important than individual romantic preferences.