Allan hyde and alexander skarsgard dating

allan hyde and alexander skarsgard dating

Son of Abraham R. Hyde and Rose R. Hyde
Husband of Natalie Hyde
Father of <private> Shapiro (Hyde); <private> Hyde; <private> Hyde; Gerald Hyde ; <private> Hyde and 2 others ; Private User and Judith Swartz « less
Brother of <private> Hyde; Max (Manuel) C. Hyde ; Alfred R. (R. Alfred) Hyde ; <private> Hyde; <private> Hyde and 2 others ; <private> Hyde and <private> Hyde « less

Alexander Gardner (October 17, 1821 – December 10, 1882) was a Scottish photographer who immigrated to the United States in 1856, where he began to work full-time in that profession. He is best known for his photographs of the American Civil War , U.S. President Abraham Lincoln , and the execution of the conspirators to Lincoln's assassination .

Gardner and his family immigrated to the United States in 1856. Finding that many friends and family members at the cooperative he had helped to form were dead or dying of tuberculosis , he stayed in New York. He initiated contact with Brady and came to work for him that year, continuing until 1862. At first, Gardner specialized in making large photographic prints, called Imperial photographs, but as Brady’s eyesight began to fail, Gardner took on increasing responsibilities. In 1858, Brady put him in charge of his Washington, D.C. gallery. [5]

Abraham Lincoln became the American President in the November 1860 election and along with his election came the threat of war. Gardner, being in Washington, was well-positioned for these events, and his popularity rose as a portrait photographer, capturing the visages of soldiers leaving for war.

Brady had the idea to photograph the Civil War. Gardner's relationship with Allan Pinkerton (who was head of an intelligence operation that would become the Secret Service ) was the key to communicating Brady's ideas to Lincoln. Pinkerton recommended Gardner for the position of chief photographer under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Topographical Engineers . Following that short appointment, Gardner became a staff photographer under General George B. McClellan , commander of the Army of the Potomac . At this point, Gardner's management of Brady's gallery ended. The honorary rank of captain was bestowed upon Gardner, and he photographed the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, developing photos in his travelling darkroom.

In 1893, photographer J. Watson Porter, who had worked for Gardner years before, tracked down hundreds of glass negatives made by Gardner, that had been left in an old house in Washington where Gardner had lived. The result was a story in the Washington Post and renewed interest in Gardner's photographs. [11]

Cracked glass portrait of Abraham Lincoln, that was considered to be the last photograph taken of the president before his death. The photo was actually taken in February 1865. [8]

FRAME | WORK is a weekly blog series that highlights an artwork in the Museums' permanent collections. This week, we feature a powerful Civil War-era photograph from The Album of the Lincoln Conspiracy . This work is currently not on view, so we have provided an exclusive online viewing!

Alexander Gardner (American, b. Scotland,1821–1882)
Lewis Powell (Alias Payne), Conspirator, Seated and Manacled, April, 1865, from the book, The Album of the Lincoln Conspiracy (Washington: Alexander Gardner, 1866) , 1865. Albumen silver print from wet-collodion-on-glass negative. Museum Purchase, Mrs. Milton S. Latham Fund. 1990.3.14

The subject of this stirring photograph is Lewis Powell, one of John Wilkes Booth's cohorts in the assassination plot against Abraham Lincoln and other government officials. On April 13, 1865, in a meeting that took place in Powell's room at Mary Surratt's boarding house, Booth assigned Powell the task of murdering Secretary of State William Seward. The next day, Powell failed in his attempted murder, but did succeed in severely wounding both the Secretary of State and his two eldest sons. Throughout the subsequent trial, Powell reportedly failed to show any remorse for his actions, although he maintained Mrs. Surratt's innocence until both of their deaths. Just over 150 years ago on July 7, 1865, Lewis Powell (tried as Payne) was executed by hanging at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C.

After the assassination of President Lincoln and the ensuing capture and death of John Wilkes Booth, Gardner photographed the remaining suspects accused of conspiring to assassinate American political officials. The psychological intensity captured in the photographs from this series was compounded by the harsh conditions in which the prisoners were kept as they awaited trial; they were blindfolded, manacled and shackled below the decks of a monitor (an ironclad warship). Powell is pictured here seated against the turret of the monitor USS Saugus , where several of the assassination conspirators were incarcerated. Alexander Gardner was the sole photographer present at the conspirators' execution.



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Alexander Gardner (October 17, 1821 – December 10, 1882) was a Scottish photographer who immigrated to the United States in 1856, where he began to work full-time in that profession. He is best known for his photographs of the American Civil War , U.S. President Abraham Lincoln , and the execution of the conspirators to Lincoln's assassination .

Gardner and his family immigrated to the United States in 1856. Finding that many friends and family members at the cooperative he had helped to form were dead or dying of tuberculosis , he stayed in New York. He initiated contact with Brady and came to work for him that year, continuing until 1862. At first, Gardner specialized in making large photographic prints, called Imperial photographs, but as Brady’s eyesight began to fail, Gardner took on increasing responsibilities. In 1858, Brady put him in charge of his Washington, D.C. gallery. [5]

Abraham Lincoln became the American President in the November 1860 election and along with his election came the threat of war. Gardner, being in Washington, was well-positioned for these events, and his popularity rose as a portrait photographer, capturing the visages of soldiers leaving for war.

Brady had the idea to photograph the Civil War. Gardner's relationship with Allan Pinkerton (who was head of an intelligence operation that would become the Secret Service ) was the key to communicating Brady's ideas to Lincoln. Pinkerton recommended Gardner for the position of chief photographer under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Topographical Engineers . Following that short appointment, Gardner became a staff photographer under General George B. McClellan , commander of the Army of the Potomac . At this point, Gardner's management of Brady's gallery ended. The honorary rank of captain was bestowed upon Gardner, and he photographed the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, developing photos in his travelling darkroom.

In 1893, photographer J. Watson Porter, who had worked for Gardner years before, tracked down hundreds of glass negatives made by Gardner, that had been left in an old house in Washington where Gardner had lived. The result was a story in the Washington Post and renewed interest in Gardner's photographs. [11]

Cracked glass portrait of Abraham Lincoln, that was considered to be the last photograph taken of the president before his death. The photo was actually taken in February 1865. [8]